Exploring Bodie Ghost Town

with No Comments

Bodie_featured

Mammoth Dual Sport Adventure RideWhile visiting Mammoth Lakes at the end of August 2016, we took a 180 mile adventure day ride and made a nice loop north stopping at one of my must-see places, Bodie ghost town. After seeing some friend’s photos on Facebook, I had to see it for myself. There is so much history in that little town and it’s a miracle it’s all still there. Bodie sits at 8379 feet elevation and is subjected to dry, warm summers as well as heavy snowfall in the winter.  Combined with the high altitude and a very exposed plateau, the town can get winds at close to 100 miles per hour. Although it’s a protected historical site and obviously receives some occasional maintenance, it’s still crazy those old buildings are still standing.

Bodie began as a little mining camp after the discovery of gold in 1859 by a group of prospectors, including W. S. Bodey, who perished in a blizzard the following November while making a supply trip to Monoville, never getting to see the rise of the town that was named after him. According to area pioneer Judge J. G. McClinton, the district’s name was changed from “Bodey,” “Body,” and a few other phonetic variations, to “Bodie,” after a painter in the nearby boomtown of Aurora, lettered a sign “Bodie Stables”.

Bodie Ghost Town

In 1876, the Standard Company discovered a profitable deposit of gold-bearing ore, which transformed Bodie from an isolated mining camp, comprising a few prospectors and company employees, to a Wild West boomtown.

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

By 1879, Bodie had a population of approximately 5000–7000 people and around 2,000 buildings.

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

One idea maintains that in 1880, Bodie was California’s second or third largest city. Over the years, Bodie’s mines produced gold valued at nearly $34 million.

Bodie Ghost Town

As a bustling gold mining center, Bodie had the amenities of larger towns, including a Wells Fargo Bank, four volunteer fire companies, a brass band, a railroad, miners’ and mechanics’ unions, several daily newspapers, and a jail. At its peak, 65 saloons lined Main Street, which was a mile long. Murders, shootouts, bar room brawls, and stagecoach holdups were regular occurrences.

The first signs of decline appeared in 1880 and became obvious towards the end of the year.

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

Promising mining booms in other nearby towns lured men away from Bodie. The get-rich-quick, single miners who originally came to the town in the 1870s moved on to these other booms, which eventually turned Bodie into a family-oriented community. Two examples of this settling were the construction of the Methodist Church (which currently stands) and the Roman Catholic Church (burned about 1930) that were both constructed in 1882. Despite the population decline, the mines were flourishing, and in 1881 Bodie’s ore production was recorded at a high of $3.1 million.

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

In 1912, last Bodie newspaper, The Bodie Miner, was printed. In 1913, the Standard Consolidated Mine closed. Mining profits in 1914 were at a low of $6,821.

Bodie Ghost Town

In 1917, the Bodie Railway was abandoned and its iron tracks were scrapped.

Bodie Ghost Town

The last mine closed in 1942, due to War Production Board order L-208, shutting down all nonessential gold mines in the United States. Mining never resumed.

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

The first label of Bodie as a “ghost town” was in 1915. In a time when auto travel was on a rise, many were adventuring into Bodie via automobiles.

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

The San Francisco Chronicle published an article in 1919 to dispute the “ghost town” label. By 1920, Bodie’s population was recorded by the US Federal Census at a total of 120 people. Despite the decline, Bodie had permanent residents through most of the 20th century, even after a fire ravaged much of the downtown business district in 1932.

Bodie Ghost Town

A post office operated at Bodie from 1877 to 1942.

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie Ghost Town

In the 1940s, the threat of vandalism faced the ghost town. The Cain family, who owned much of the land the town is situated upon, hired caretakers to protect and to maintain the town’s structures. Martin Gianettoni, one of the last three people in Bodie in 1943, was also a caretaker.

Bodie Ghost Town

Bodie is now an authentic Wild West ghost town. The town was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1961, and in 1962 it became Bodie State Historic Park. A total of 170 buildings remained. Bodie has been named California’s official state gold rush ghost town.

Bodie Ghost Town

Today, Bodie is preserved in a state of arrested decay. Only a small part of the town survived, with about 110 structures still standing, including one of many once operational gold mills. Visitors can walk the deserted streets of a town that once was a bustling area of activity.

Bodie Ghost Town
Bodie Ghost Town
Interiors remain as they were left and stocked with goods.

Bodie Ghost Town

If you have the chance to go see Bodie for yourself, do it! Make sure you have several hours to explore the whole town and even the outskirts. Bring some comfortable shoes, a snack and some water. Don’t forget a camera too! It’s a photographer’s playground.

 

All photos © Pete Greep

Much of the information about Bodie is from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodie,_California

Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *